melodysparks: (Default)
Spencer Smith Park, Burlington, Ontario

The Royal Canadian Naval Association Burlington Branch, unveiled that Naval Ships' Memorial Monument, May 14, 1995, with approximately 5,000 spectators, including over 1,000 veterans in attendance.

The memorial is dedicated to the memory of the 31 warships and the 2024 Naval Personnel of the Royal Canadian Navy and the 75 ships and 1466 merchant seamen of the Canadian Merchant Navy who were lost during World War II.

The cairn and ships' remembrance wall is Cambrian Black granite, inscribed with the names of all the 527 Warships that served during World War II in the Royal Canadian Navy under the white ensign, and of the 370 merchant ships that sailed under the red duster of the Canadian Merchant Navy. The ships' names are in gold, the crests are carved and in full colour. A bronze statue of a seaman tops off the cairn.

The memorial is located near the willow trees in Spencer Smith Park. If you served in the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II, your ship's name is on the remembrance wall.

Naval Ships' Memorial Monument
melodysparks: (Default)
Some more statues and memorials. I will be visiting the National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas in Staffordshire again on 24th June so I hope to have some new pictures to show

Numbness - National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

Numbness - National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

Carving Their Names with Pride

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

Miner - Hucknall Nottinghamshire

Miner

Stone Sentinel - Old Market Square Nottingham

Stone Sentinal

A Mighty Blow for Freedom - Temple Gardens Usher Museum at Linco

A Mighty Blow for Freedom Statue

Thomas Cook - Leicester Railway Station Leicester

Thomas Cook

George Stephenson - Chesterfield Railway Station Chesterfield Derbyshire

George Stephenson

D H Lawrence Bust - Nottingham Castle Nottingham

D H Lawrence or Terminator
melodysparks: (Default)
A few more of my statues and monument photographs


Dandilion Seed Cherub - All Saints South Wingfield

Dandilion Seed Cherub - All Saints South Wingfield

Toronto War Memorial, University Avenue, Toronto

Memorial

Tennyson - Lincoln Cathedral Lincolnshire

Tennyson

Hucknall No2 Colliery - Hucknall, Nottinghamshire

Shovelling the coal

Shovelling the Coal

Richard Perry's The Quartet - Chapel Bar Nottingham

Quartet

Ask

A Mighty Blow for Freedom - Temple Gardens Usher Museum at Lincoln

A Mighty Blow for Freedom - Lincoln
melodysparks: (Default)
Some of the places you will generally find me when I am out and about with my camera is in front of a statue or memorial, often I have been known to wander around a cemetery or two.

Here are a few of the images I have taken

Armed Forces Memorial National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

WIlford Hill

Untitled

Christ & Mary B&W

Prayers

Angel B&W

Victory - War Memorial on the Slopes, Buxton

War Memorial on the Slopes, Buxton

Victory War Memorial on the Slopes, Buxton B&W

West Front Lichfield Cathedral Staffordshire

Lichfield Cathedral

Bishop Ryder Lichfield Cathedral Staffordshire

Bishop Ryder by Sir Francis Chantrey
melodysparks: (Default)
Silhouettes today from me. Just these two images in this post.

Shadow of the sun

I took this in late afternoon as the sun was decending over the city with the camera pointed directly at the light I was able to pick up long shadows by increasing the ISO and the aperture f stops to 20. This darkened the settings to give this rich golden blaze of light


Miner

I live not to far from Hucknall in Nottinghamshire which is the home town to the family church St Mary Magdalene of the Byron Family where the poet Lord Gordon George Byron and his daughter Mathematician and first computer programmer Countess Ada Lovelace are interred in the family vault. Hucknall was also once a coal mining town until the closure of the colliery on the 80’s. This next picture is the memorial that can be found in Hucknall. Given to Hucknall by Ashfield District Council to commemorate the people who worked at the Hucknall No2 Colliery from 1866 unitl 1986. Unveiled 25 June 2005. Created by Graham Ibbeson M.A (R.C.A).. The memorial itself is a representation of a Davey lamp, this image is just the top part of it.

Believe me this is definately a statue regardless of the excellent detail that makes him look alive



Should anyone wish a copy of any of my photographs, please just drop me a line and I can always send you a higher resolution/ bigger image to use.
melodysparks: (Default)
I took these images at the National Memoriam Arboretum in Alrewas Staffordshire. A wonderful arboretum dedicated to memorials for all walks of life

Carved in stone

Every fallen British soldier, sailor, airman, ancilliary member since the end of hostilities in 1945 of WWII are named in this the general British Armed FOrces Memorial.

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

One of the pieces of the British Armed Forces Memorial.

Devastation - National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

Polish Memorial National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

Polish Memorial National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

One of the pieces of the British Armed Forces Memorial.

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

One of the pieces of the British Armed Forces Memorial.

Photographs

Feb. 9th, 2012 10:48 am
melodysparks: (psycho squirrel)
Today I wanted to share a few of my pictures with everyone on here. I would like your opinions and criticisms please

Lincoln Cathedral

I braved bouts of vertigo and squeezed up a slippery and winding stair into the Observation Tower at Lincoln Castle to capture this view. There was no way I was waiting for the cloud to move away as it was I am surprised I got a decent picture with all my shaking. The Magnificent magnificent 11th-century Cathedral, standing on top of Lincoln edge
Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, or sometimes St. Mary's Cathedral) is a historic cathedral in Lincoln in England and seat of the Diocese of Lincoln in the Church of England. It was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years, but the central spire collapsed in the sixteenth century and was not rebuilt. It is highly regarded by architectural scholars; the eminent Victorian writer John Ruskin declared, "I have always held... that the cathedral of Lincoln is out and out the most precious piece of architecture in the British Isles and roughly speaking worth any two other cathedrals we have."
William the Conqueror ordered the first cathedral to be built in Lincoln, in 1072. Before that, St. Mary's Church in Lincoln was a mother church but not a cathedral, and the seat of the diocese was at Dorchester Abbey in Dorchester-on-Thames, Oxfordshire. Lincoln was more central to a diocese that stretched from the Thames to the Humber. Bishop Remigius built the first Lincoln Cathedral on the present site, finishing it in 1092 and then dying two days before it was to be consecrated on May 9 of that year. About fifty years later, most of that building was destroyed in a fire. Bishop Alexander rebuilt and expanded the cathedral, but it was destroyed by an earthquake about forty years later, in 1185.

Shot at Dawn National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

This memorial effected me I was deeply moved and appalled by the story of these poor hapless and unfortunate young men

Shot at Dawn at the National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire. During the First World War some 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice in most cases the soldier was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder or shell shock. Many of them were sentenced after a short trial without opportunity for a proper defence. Many of the soldiers were young in their late teens or very eary twenties. ‘Shot at Dawn’ is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 and one of the few who were only aged 17 who lied about their age to serve. Private Burden is buried at Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres

Not one of the executed soldiers would be shot today - the military death penalty was outlawed in 1930. But psychologist Dr Petra Boynton believes that, even 90 years ago, there was no excuse for killing soldiers who were so obviously under the most extreme stress.

In August 2006 all 306 soldiers of the First World War who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion were granted posthumous pardons by the British Government

Shot at Dawn is one of the photographs I am exhibiting at my local library with Flickr Nottingham Group

Wollaton's Red Deer
Wollaton's Red Deer. Wollaton Hall is a country house standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton, Nottingham, England. Wollaton Park is the area of parkland that the stately house stands in. The house itself is a natural history museum, with other museums in the out-buildings. The surrounding land is regularly used for large scale outdoor events such as rock concerts and festivals.

Wollaton was built between 1580 and 1588 for Sir Francis Willoughby and is believed to be designed by the Elizabethan architect, Robert Smythson, who was the architect of Hardwick Hall. The building is of Ancaster stone from Lincolnshire, and is said to have been paid for with coal from the Wollaton pits owned by the Willoughbys

The grounds, Wollaton Park, are the home to the Intercounties Cross Country trials in March of each year, as well as many other events.

The enclosure of Wollaton Park required the destruction of the village of Sutton Passeys. It was enclosed by Henry Willoughby, 6th Baron Middleton with a 7 mile red brick wall,[5] at the start of the nineteenth century. Originally 790 acres, land sales have reduced the park to 500 acres.

The park is home to a herd of Red Deer and Fallow Deer.

The Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) is one of the largest deer species. The Red Deer inhabits most of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains region, Asia Minor and parts of western and central Asia. It also inhabits the Atlas Mountains region between Morocco and Tunisia in northwestern Africa, being the only species of deer to inhabit Africa. Red Deer have been introduced to other areas including Australia, New Zealand and Argentina. In many parts of the world the meat (venison) from Red Deer is used as a food source.

Recently it was chosen to be the new home of Batman for the up an coming movie in 2012 and its only 4 miles up the A52 from the real Gotham

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