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Through this spaces a shaft of sunlight falls at the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month

Armed Forces Memorial, National Memorial Arboretum, ALrewas, Staffordshire

Part of the statues within the Armed Forces Memorial Alrewas Staffordshire.

This memorial is for those members of the British Armed Forces and their ancilliary staff killed since the end of WWII

melodysparks: (Default)




Armed Forces Memorial, National Memorial Arboretum, ALrewas, Staffordshire

Part of the statues within the Armed Forces Memorial Alrewas Staffordshire.

This memorial is for those members of the British Armed Forces and their ancilliary staff killed since the end of WWII

Tears

Jul. 28th, 2012 03:04 am
melodysparks: (Default)
Tears by Melodysparks (Chris Preedy)
Tears, a photo by Melodysparks (Chris Preedy) on Flickr.




Armed Forces Memorial, National Memorial Arboretum, ALrewas, Staffordshire

Part of the statues within the Armed Forces Memorial Alrewas Staffordshire.

This memorial is for those members of the British Armed Forces and their ancilliary staff killed since the end of WWII

melodysparks: (Default)
I visited the National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas in Staffordshire again today with two of my photography buddies. I got to admit we did miss our fourth Musketeer. Whenever the four of us ventured out together on a photogrpahy walk the weather was tempremental for the most part. I can remember the visit to Tutbury Castle in Staffordshire before going on to Lichfield Cathedral when all it did was rain although that it didn't stop us taking the cameras out and grabing a few photographs. Dull dismal weather is useful sometimes to get lovely atmospheric images. Guy always blamed Pete considering the walks we had attended when Pete was not with us were always dry and sunny. Well Guy wasn't with us today, he emegrated to the US last November and although we had one or two short showers the rest of the days was dry and often sunny.

Our last visit to Alrewas just over a year ago was dull with a few odd showers but we managed to walk around half of the arboretum and get some smashing images. We promised that we would pay a return visit when the weather was better. Later in the afternoon the weather changed for the better when we reached Fradley Junction for a late lunch and a walk along the canals.

AT the start of the week the long range forecast was not good and I refered to the three weather sites I check frequently (Surprisingly all three seem to have a different forecast from each other, The weather Channel, The BBC and The Met Office so which one do you believe?) I usually follow the advice of the Met Office after all they are supposed to be the source of the weather information. All three sites predicted a wet week with Saturday dry and sunny (Which it was) and a mixture of sunshine and showers for Sunday. We had both not that the weather would put us off anyway.

The National Memorial Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers and is part of The Royal British Legion family. It is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance, a living and lasting memorial to commemorate and celebrate those who have lost their lives in the service of their country, those who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and other who for specific or appropriate reasons are commemorated on the site. Not only are the British Armed Forces commemorated here but other services link the police force, fire brigade, ambulance service, railway workers, RNLI and many more in 150 acres of wooded parkland within the National Forest in Staffordshire. The site was purpose built 11 years ago and receives over 300,000 visitors a year but relies on donations to exist.

Our visit today was to visit some of the new memorials that have been errected in the last year like the Railway workers memorial and the new Falklands memorial and the other half of the arboretum we did not see last visit. It was also a chance to visit the main British Armed Forces memorial again prior to the Olympic Torch visit and Armed Services Day events scheduled next week.

Because there are over 200 events annually at the arboretum you can often see a few veterans wandering around. Today seemed to have a mixture of visitors but I couldn't fail to miss Ghurkas and former army veterans for a service before the main memorial and the Naval reservists drilling for next weekends events. It is a place I know my father would love to visit as he is an active veteran of the Notts and Derbys Sherwood Foresters (now known as the second Mercian Regiment) and generally tends to visit the memorial events including the Rememberance parades in London on November and presently preparing for his annual pilgrimage to the Sherwood Foresters Memorial at Crich in Derbyshire for nexts weeks service.

I haven't the foggiest idea where this post is going but I feel a little out of sorts at the moment, melancholic perhaps, I did last time we visited despite a good day out. I do know that I felt a little choaked when I saw that since my last visit to the main memorial 3 panels had been carved with the names of those killed during the last year and I know that this time next year many more named will have been added to that list.

I did take some photographs which I have yet to take a look at or bother with converting from the RAW format since I arrived home but maybe that is just a reflection of the way I feel at the moment, that and perhaps fatigue and general reflection. I think I am in need of a few days to just clear my mind before tackling the images I took. I have a mixture of memorials and statues to show you.

I wanted to post something today but I can't get my head around it at the moment maybe in a few days.

Sorry.
melodysparks: (Default)
I took these images at the National Memoriam Arboretum in Alrewas Staffordshire. A wonderful arboretum dedicated to memorials for all walks of life

Carved in stone

Every fallen British soldier, sailor, airman, ancilliary member since the end of hostilities in 1945 of WWII are named in this the general British Armed FOrces Memorial.

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

One of the pieces of the British Armed Forces Memorial.

Devastation - National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

Polish Memorial National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

Polish Memorial National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

One of the pieces of the British Armed Forces Memorial.

National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

One of the pieces of the British Armed Forces Memorial.

Photographs

Feb. 9th, 2012 10:48 am
melodysparks: (psycho squirrel)
Today I wanted to share a few of my pictures with everyone on here. I would like your opinions and criticisms please

Lincoln Cathedral

I braved bouts of vertigo and squeezed up a slippery and winding stair into the Observation Tower at Lincoln Castle to capture this view. There was no way I was waiting for the cloud to move away as it was I am surprised I got a decent picture with all my shaking. The Magnificent magnificent 11th-century Cathedral, standing on top of Lincoln edge
Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, or sometimes St. Mary's Cathedral) is a historic cathedral in Lincoln in England and seat of the Diocese of Lincoln in the Church of England. It was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years, but the central spire collapsed in the sixteenth century and was not rebuilt. It is highly regarded by architectural scholars; the eminent Victorian writer John Ruskin declared, "I have always held... that the cathedral of Lincoln is out and out the most precious piece of architecture in the British Isles and roughly speaking worth any two other cathedrals we have."
William the Conqueror ordered the first cathedral to be built in Lincoln, in 1072. Before that, St. Mary's Church in Lincoln was a mother church but not a cathedral, and the seat of the diocese was at Dorchester Abbey in Dorchester-on-Thames, Oxfordshire. Lincoln was more central to a diocese that stretched from the Thames to the Humber. Bishop Remigius built the first Lincoln Cathedral on the present site, finishing it in 1092 and then dying two days before it was to be consecrated on May 9 of that year. About fifty years later, most of that building was destroyed in a fire. Bishop Alexander rebuilt and expanded the cathedral, but it was destroyed by an earthquake about forty years later, in 1185.

Shot at Dawn National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire.

This memorial effected me I was deeply moved and appalled by the story of these poor hapless and unfortunate young men

Shot at Dawn at the National Memorial Arboretum at Alrewas Staffordshire. During the First World War some 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot for desertion or cowardice in most cases the soldier was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder or shell shock. Many of them were sentenced after a short trial without opportunity for a proper defence. Many of the soldiers were young in their late teens or very eary twenties. ‘Shot at Dawn’ is modelled on Private Herbert Burden, of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, who was shot at Ypres in 1915 and one of the few who were only aged 17 who lied about their age to serve. Private Burden is buried at Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres

Not one of the executed soldiers would be shot today - the military death penalty was outlawed in 1930. But psychologist Dr Petra Boynton believes that, even 90 years ago, there was no excuse for killing soldiers who were so obviously under the most extreme stress.

In August 2006 all 306 soldiers of the First World War who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion were granted posthumous pardons by the British Government

Shot at Dawn is one of the photographs I am exhibiting at my local library with Flickr Nottingham Group

Wollaton's Red Deer
Wollaton's Red Deer. Wollaton Hall is a country house standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton, Nottingham, England. Wollaton Park is the area of parkland that the stately house stands in. The house itself is a natural history museum, with other museums in the out-buildings. The surrounding land is regularly used for large scale outdoor events such as rock concerts and festivals.

Wollaton was built between 1580 and 1588 for Sir Francis Willoughby and is believed to be designed by the Elizabethan architect, Robert Smythson, who was the architect of Hardwick Hall. The building is of Ancaster stone from Lincolnshire, and is said to have been paid for with coal from the Wollaton pits owned by the Willoughbys

The grounds, Wollaton Park, are the home to the Intercounties Cross Country trials in March of each year, as well as many other events.

The enclosure of Wollaton Park required the destruction of the village of Sutton Passeys. It was enclosed by Henry Willoughby, 6th Baron Middleton with a 7 mile red brick wall,[5] at the start of the nineteenth century. Originally 790 acres, land sales have reduced the park to 500 acres.

The park is home to a herd of Red Deer and Fallow Deer.

The Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) is one of the largest deer species. The Red Deer inhabits most of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains region, Asia Minor and parts of western and central Asia. It also inhabits the Atlas Mountains region between Morocco and Tunisia in northwestern Africa, being the only species of deer to inhabit Africa. Red Deer have been introduced to other areas including Australia, New Zealand and Argentina. In many parts of the world the meat (venison) from Red Deer is used as a food source.

Recently it was chosen to be the new home of Batman for the up an coming movie in 2012 and its only 4 miles up the A52 from the real Gotham

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